Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Thursday, November 23. 2017

Today's schedule is D-C-B-A

D Block Criminology 12 -Today we continue with our unit on media literacy. We will talk about the history of media and communication formats (I'll give you a handout on the topic and we'll go over it today). So...

I want you to track your consumption of media for one day. Today we'll estimate how much time of the day you think you consume and interact with media. We'll look at this Kaiser Family Foundation study from 2010 and it will give us a good idea about amounts. The Info-graphic to the left from MBAOnline posted at Socialmouth is a good visual of generational differences for media consumption throughout the day. So for you...at the end of each hour that you are awake for one day I'd like you to write down what media format you interacted with for that previous hour and guesstimate how much time you interacted with it. I know that you are a generation of multi-taskers (and that you are interacting with this blog right now) so try to be as honest as you can about what you consume/interact with.




Remember the types of Mass Media include: Print media encompasses mass communication through printed material. It includes newspapers, magazines, booklets and brochures, house magazines, periodicals or newsletters, direct mailers, handbills or flyers, billboards, press releases, and books. Electronic media is the kind of media which requires the user to utilize an electric connection to access it. It is also known as 'Broadcast Media'. It includes television, radio, and new-age media like Internet, computers, telephones, etc. With the advent of Internet, we are now enjoying the benefits of high technology mass media, which is not only faster than the old school mass media, but also has a widespread range. Mobile phones, computers, and Internet are often referred to as the new-age media. Internet has opened up several new opportunities for mass communication which include e-mail, websites, podcasts, e-forums, e-books, blogging, Internet TV, and many others which are booming today. Internet has also started social networking sites which have redefined mass communication all together. Sites like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube have made communication to the masses all the more entertaining, interesting, and easier.

I'm going to hold off on the MMIWG and Highway of Tears until Tuesday next week. Because we didn't get to it yesterday tyoday I'd like to watch the Batman: The Animated Series Two Face (part 1) and  Two Face (Part II). These episodes provide an alternate origin story to Harvey Dent / Two Face than the movie The Dark Knight.

The animated series was a sort of watershed for crime serial animation in that it was styled after a "film noir" format (a gritty and dark Hollywood genre of crime dramas from the 1940's and 1950's). This episode is almost 25 years old (yep from 1992) and is a brilliant example of a cartoon series taking its audience seriously. It provided gripping, intelligent, and compelling episodes that did not shy away from important issues and was adept at examining crime from a criminology perspective (It even won an Emmy award in 1993 for "Outstanding Animated Program - for the episode "Robin's Reckoning"). It is sophisticated, mature, artistic, and faithful to the Batman cannon.

from TV.com...Harvey Dent, campaigning for a re-election, vows to rid Gotham of Rupert Thorne's crime and corruption. The tables turn when Thorne gets a hold of Dent's psychological records and discovers his alternate personality the violent Big Bad Harv. Thorne attempts to blackmail the DA with this, and the following fight in Thorne's chemical plant hideout results in an explosion that scars the left side of Dent's body, despite Batman's attempts to save him.

So when we finish the episode we'll try to make sense of what messages the episode tries to pass on to its audience (remember it's children), what the episode says of crime and what mass media theory we can use to explain how the creators (Bruce Timm and Eric Radomski) and writers (Alan Burnett and Randy Rogel) presented their ideas.

C Block Human Geography 11 - Today we continue with our topic around the key question "Why Do Conflicts Arise among Ethnicities?" Our focus today will be Lebanon, Sri Lanka, India and the Kurds. For the Kurds and Kurdistan a good primer is this GPS video from CNN with Fareed Zakaria as well as this article form the Economist or this article from Foreign Policy or the website "The Kurdish Project" following videos help too:




Next we'll look at Sri Lanka and the conflict between the Tamil minority and Sinhalese majority. For help ThoughtCo. has a nice piece on the Civil War as does Al Jazeera as does A World Without Genocide.



And, of course, there is the partition of India which displaced fifteen million people and killed more than a million as the British left India and religious communities were pitted against one another. The Guardian has a good article Why Pakistan and India remain in denial 70 years on from partition and the Conversation has an article How the Partition of India happened – and why its effects are still felt today and there's also a good piece on the BBC Partition of India: My memories

OH WAIT...Don't forget Jammu & Kashmir

B Block Physical Geography 12 - Today we'll continue our look at weather by reviewing yesterday's topics of energy distribution and the greenhouse effect (and connect those topics to global warming). Our next focus will then be on heat and temperature in the atmosphere. We'll take a look at two sections of the National Geographic video "Six Degrees Could Change the World" (1 to 3 degree temperature changes). In class today, you will need to work on questions 9 & 11 on page 118 AND questions 5, 8, 12 & 13 from page 141 and 16 from page 142 of your Geosystems textbook. We will pay more attention to global warming and climate change later on in the course.

Don't forget that every day we are going to start by looking at the synoptic forecast along with weather maps.
Data Streme
Envrionment Canada: Weather Office Comox

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Wednesday, November 22. 2017

Today's schedule is B-A-D-C

B Block Physical Geography 12 - Today we'll begin looking at Albedo, energy distribution, and the greenhouse effect. NASA has a good website (Earth Observatory Global Warming) that tries to explain the concept of climate change and global warming without a biased political viewpoint for or against the subject. Check it out. You could also look at the Hyper Physics website from the department of Physics and Astronomy at Georgia State University. We'll take a look at two sections of the National Geographic video "Six Degrees Could Change the World" (1 to 3 degree temperature changes).We will pay more attention to global warming and climate change later on in the course.

Every day we are going to start by looking at the synoptic forecast along with weather maps.
Data Streme
Envrionment Canada: Weather Office Comox

D Block Criminology 12 - Over the next two weeks we'll look at Mass Media Theories and Media Literacy. Today we'll look at the elements of Media Literacy...one key element of media literacy is that:

1. Media are constructions - Media products are created by individuals who make conscious and unconscious choices about what to include, what to leave out and how to present what is included. These decisions are based on the creators’ own point of view, which will have been shaped by their opinions, assumptions and biases – as well as media they have been exposed to. As a result of this, media products are never entirely accurate reflections of the real world – even the most objective documentary filmmaker has to decide what footage to use and what to cut, as well as where to put the camera – but we instinctively view many media products as direct representations of what is real...

So today we will present our media analysis of the advertisements that you and your partner were assigned yesterday in class. Remember I asked you to practice the skills of critical analysis of the message and the medium. After your presentations we'll go through your first handout for the course on media literacy and critical thinking.

If there's time, we'll watch Batman: The Animated Series Two Face (part 1) and if time Two Face (Part II). These episodes provide an alternate origin story to Harvey Dent / Two Face than the movie The Dark Knight. The animated series was a sort of watershed for crime serial animation in that it was styled after a "film noir" format (a gritty and dark Hollywood genre of crime dramas from the 1940's and 1950's). This episode is 25 years old (yep from 1992) and is a brilliant example of a cartoon series taking its audience seriously. It provided gripping, intelligent, and compelling episodes that did not shy away from important issues and was adept at examining crime from a criminological perspective.

C Block Human Geography 11 - Today and tomorrow our topic centers around the key question "Why Do Conflicts Arise among Ethnicities?". As with your big thinking question on religious conflict there is no easy answer to this inquiry.  In some cases, ethnicities compete in civil wars to dominate the national identity. In other cases, problems result from division of ethnicities among more than one state. Today we'll look at the Quebec, Scotland and Catalan nationalist movements, while tomorrow we'll look at Lebanon, Sri Lanka, India and the Kurds.

Monday, November 20, 2017

Tuesday, November 21. 2017

Today's schedule is C-D-A-B

C Block Human Geography 11 - Today we'll examine the key issue: Why Do Ethnicities Have Distinct Distribution? We'll start with a quick review of the triangular slave trade and the concentrated population of African Americans in the American southeast (you know due to slavery). Then we'll look at the inter-regional migration from the rural U.S. South to northern and western urban areas in the mid to late 20th Century. Connected to this will be "Jim Crow" laws, "white flight", and civil rights. Lastly we'll look at Apartheid in South Africa and you'll have some questions to work on for me.




D Block Criminology 12 - First we'll start with a quick discussion about yesterday's blog questions on Scooby Doo. As you know, Scooby Doo is a long-running animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions (and now Cartoon Network Studios) from 1969 to 1991 and 2002 to present highlighting the hi jinx of Scooby-Doo and four teenagers: Fred "Freddie" Jones, Daphne Blake, Velma Dinkley, and Norville "Shaggy" Rogers. These five drive around the world in a van called the "Mystery Machine," and solve mysteries typically involving tales of ghosts and other supernatural forces. At the end of each episode, the supernatural forces turn out to have a rational explanation (usually a criminal of some sort attempting to scare people away so that he/she could commit crimes). So after watching a couple of episodes yesterday I asked you:
  1. What assumptions or beliefs do Scooby Doo’s creators have that are reflected in the content?
  2. How does this make you feel, based on how similar or different you are from the people portrayed in the media product?
  3. How does the commercial purpose (it's made for a profit right?) of Scooby Doo cartoons influence the content and how it's communicated?
  4. Who and what is shown in a positive light? In a negative light? Why might these people and things be shown this way?
  5. Who and what is not shown at all? What conclusions might audiences draw based on these facts?
  6.  "How does Scooby Doo explain crime and gender roles to young people"?

After, we'll start our unit on media literacy. Not only are media constructions (made by humans) but that the receiving audience interprets the meaning of the message themselves.


  1. Media are constructions - Media products are created by individuals who make conscious and unconscious choices about what to include, what to leave out and how to present what is included. These decisions are based on the creators’ own point of view, which will have been shaped by their opinions, assumptions and biases – as well as media they have been exposed to. As a result of this, media products are never entirely accurate reflections of the real world – even the most objective documentary filmmaker has to decide what footage to use and what to cut, as well as where to put the camera – but we instinctively view many media products as direct representations of what is real.

2. Audiences negotiate meaning - The meaning of any media product is not created solely by its producers but is, instead, a collaboration between them and the audience – which means that different audiences can take away different meanings from the same product. Media literacy encourages us to understand how individual factors, such as age, gender, race and social status affect our interpretations of media.

 3. Media have commercial implications - Most media production is a business and must, therefore, make a profit. In addition, media industries belong to a powerful network of corporations that exert influence on content and distribution. Questions of ownership and control are central – a relatively small number of individuals control what we watch, read and hear in the media. Even in cases where media content is not made for profit – such as YouTube videos and Facebook posts -- the ways in which content is distributed are nearly always run with profit in mind.

4. Media have social and political implications - Media convey ideological messages about values, power and authority. In media literacy, what or who is absent may be more important than what or who is included. These messages may be the result of conscious decisions, but more often they are the result of unconscious biases and unquestioned assumptions – and they can have a significant influence on what we think and believe. As a result, media have great influence on politics and on forming social change. TV news coverage and advertising can greatly influence the election of a national leader on the basis of image; representations of world issues, both in journalism and fiction, can affect how much attention they receive; and society's views towards different groups can be directly influenced by how – and how often – they appear in media

5. Each medium has a unique aesthetic form - The content of media depends in part on the nature of the medium. This includes the technical, commercial and storytelling demands of each medium: for instance, the interactive nature of video games leads to different forms of storytelling – and different demands on media creators – that are found in film and TV.

So, I'll ask you to work in partners - groups of two (dyads) on commercial advertisements that I'll give you today. I'll ask you to practice the skills of critical analysis of the message and the medium. Together as a class we'll look at each commercial and try to consider the message that it sends to people.

B Block Physical Geography 12 - Today we'll begin our look at stratospheric ozone and air pollution. Ozone is a gas that occurs both in the Earth's upper atmosphere and at ground level. Ozone can be "good" or "bad" for your health and the environment, depending on its location in the atmosphere. After looking at the ways that ozone protects us and understanding how it can be destroyed by CFCs you'll need to complete questions 8 and 9 from page 90 in your Geosystems textbook. We'll also look at air pollution, specifically the anthropogenic additions to our atmosphere. We will look at the effects of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxides on human health and terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We'll also look at the Environment Canada Air Quality Index


For more information on Air Quality look at:
BC Air Quality Readings
Real Time Air Quality Index Map
The Habitable Planet: Air Pollution
Environment Canada Air Pollution site
David Suzuki Foundation Air Pollution Site
For more information on Ozone look at:
Environment Canada Ozone site
US Environmental Protection Agency Stratospheric Ozone page
European Commission on the Environment Ozone page
Ozzy Ozone UNEP Kids Ozone Site
NOAA Ozone depletion page
EPA Health Effects of Increased UV Radiation

National Public Radio site on the London "Killer Fog" of 1952
EPA website on acid rain

Check out last year's article on the New York Times about the smog covering New Delhi
Check out this year's article on CNN indicating that breathing in Delhi air is equivalent to smoking 44 cigarettes a day


Sunday, November 19, 2017

Monday, November 20. 2017

Today's schedule is A-B-C-D

B Block Physical Geography 12 -Today we'll look at the composition and vertical structure of the atmosphere focusing on the bottom two layers (Troposphere and Stratosphere) through this we'll complete the Atmosphere in the Vertical activity along with a few questions on the atmosphere. The atmosphere can be divided into layers based on the atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles (the way these quantities change with height). Atmospheric temperature drops steadily from its value at the surface, about 290K (63°F; 17°C), until it reaches a minimum of around 220K (–64°F;–53°C) at 6 mi (10 km) above the surface. The atmosphere has 4 layers: the troposphere that we live in near the surface of the earth; the stratosphere that houses the ozone layer; the mesosphere, a colder and lower density layer with about 0.1% of the atmosphere; and the thermosphere, the top layer, where the air is hot but very thin.

Every day we are going to start by looking at the synoptic forecast along with weather maps.
Data Streme
Envrionment Canada: Weather Office Comox

The Weather Network

C Block Human Geography 11 - Today we'll look at the key question Where Are Ethnicities Distributed? With this we'll examine this question both in a Canadian and an American context (as the text is American we will supplement it and add Canada to the conversation). The meaning of ethnicity is often confused with the definition of race and nationality. Ethnicity is identity with a group of people who share cultural traditions of a particular homeland or hearth. In Canada more than 200 ethnic origins were reported by respondents to the 2011 National Household Survey, 57.9% of the population reported one ethnic origin and the rest, 42.1%, reported more than one origin. In the 2016 Census, over 250 ethnic origins or ancestries were reported by the Canadian population. Who are they and where are they distributed across Canada are what we'll look at today.
Vancouver Sun: Almost 7 in 10 Metro residents will be non-white in two decades
Ethnic and cultural origins of Canadians: Portrait of a rich heritage
CBC News 21.9% of Canadians are immigrants, the highest share in 85 years
CTV News Latest census numbers showcase Canada's ever-evolving ethnic diversity

Open Text BC Introduction to Sociology text "Race and Ethnicity" chapter

D Block Criminology 12 - Most of us will have started out watching crime through the relatively innocent eyes of Scooby Doo. So today I'd like you to watch the “What’s New Scooby Doo” episode called “Ready to Scare”? (It ran on the WB from 2002-2006).



How is this version of Scooby Doo different than the one from the newer one Scooby Doo, Mystery Incorporated!


 

Or the newer, newer one (Be Cool, Scooby Doo)?


 
Or the older one (Scooby Doo and Scrappy Doo)?



Or the older, older one (The Scooby Doo Show)?



Or the older, older, older one (Scooby Doo Where are You?)


Lastly I'll have you watch this and then answer the questions below (about Scooby Doo in general including Scooby Doo Where are You?, The Scooby Doo Show, Scooby Doo and Scrappy Doo, What's New Scooby Doo, Scooby Doo! Mystery Incorporated, and Be Cool Scooby Doo):



  1. What assumptions or beliefs do Scooby Doo’s creators have that are reflected in the content?
  2. How does this make you feel, based on how similar or different you are from the people portrayed in the media product?
  3. How does the commercial purpose (it's made for a profit right?) of Scooby Doo cartoons influence the content and how it's communicated?
  4. Who and what is shown in a positive light? In a negative light? Why might these people and things be shown this way?
  5. Who and what is not shown at all? What conclusions might audiences draw based on these facts?
  6.  "How does Scooby Doo explain crime and gender roles to young people"?
Huffington Post article on Daphne's Curse of going from size 2 to size 8
Huffington Post article on Beauty Stereotypes in Scooby Doo

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Friday, November 17. 2017

Today's schedule is A-B-C-D

B Block Physical Geography 12 - Good job on the test yesterday family! Remember that week 10 work and the Medicine Hat topographic map? You'll have some time to work on that and then...Today....Oh today we start with weather, the best topic ever! I'll have you brainstorm a list of things you know (or think you know) about weather and then I'll try to answer questions you've always wanted answered about the topic. I'm so excited to be starting weather! Hail, lightning, tornadoes, and hurricanes are four on "the list" get ready, it's going to be a bumpy ride.

C Block Human Geography 11 - Good job on the test yesterday family! You have the block to work on your Week 10 package section key question "Why Do Territorial Conflicts Arise Among Religious Groups"? Even though almost all religions preach a doctrine of peace and love, religion has been at the center of conflicts throughout history. Conflict is horribly complex and cannot be easily bundled up in a simple explanation of "land" or "culture" or  "resources" or "religion", so keep this in mind when trying to answer this week's Big Thinking Question:

Explain why religious conflicts occur. Is it only that religious ideologies disagree, or is geography involved? How do you think religious conflicts can be resolved? 

Use the following to help:


D Block Criminology 12 - Okay so let's wrap this up. Last week we looked at gangs. From Foreign Policy:
Drugs are just the tip of the iceberg. In the popular U.S. television series Breaking Bad, about a high school teacher turned methamphetamine kingpin, there was an instructive exchange. When the show's antihero, Walter White, was asked whether he "was in the meth business or the money business," he replied, "I'm in the empire business." The same can be said of the DTOs (Drug Trafficking Organizations), which are independent and competing entities. The sale of cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and meth remains extremely profitable. The U.S. Justice Department has put the cartels' U.S. drug trade at $39 billion annually. But the DTOs have diversified their business considerably, both to increase their profits and to exclude rivals from new sources of revenue. For example, they are dealing increasingly in pirated intellectual property, like counterfeit software, CDs, and DVDs. The most destructive new "product," however, is people. The cartels have built a multi billion-dollar business in human trafficking, including the shipment of both illegal immigrants and sex workers.

So to curb the power of cartels or gangs should we take some radical action? Should we cut off their source of income (like drugs and sex trade workers)? Here are two questions for you to answer:


  1. Should drugs be legalized? Why? If you believe drugs should be legalized, think about whether all drugs should be legalized or just a select few. Why should certain drugs be legalized and others not? 
  2. Should prostitution be legalized? Why? If you believe it should be legalized, should all the forms of prostitution described in your text be legalized, or only a select few? If prostitution were legalized should government be able to exercise some control over it? 
Use Chapters 12 & 13 of the CRIM text to help along with yesterday's blog to help.